task adaptation

This task will be completed in stages (mostly in class, but some out-of-class collaboration may be necessary). Your groupworthy task will be evaluated according to the criteria for groupworthy tasks described by Horn (2012) in Chapter 4. In other words, throughout the various stages of this assignment you should demonstrate evidence of designing a task that:

  • Focuses on central mathematical concepts or ideas
  • Requires some interpretation
  • Provides multiple ways of being competent in problem solving
  • Done in a group, which bolsters students’ interdependence
  • Designed in a way that provides group and individual accountability
  • Has clear evaluation criteria

Stage 1 – Choosing a task for adaptation

One of the first steps in designing a groupworthy task is to choose a task that has potential for multiple abilities, focuses on a central mathematical concept or idea, and requires some interpretation. The task doesn’t need to do these things yet, BUT you need to see some potential for the task to do these things. Bring this task with you to class in Week 4 and provide a brief rationale for why you chose this task (i.e., What potential do you see for multiple abilities, central mathematical concepts, and interpretation?)

Stage 2 – Identifying multiple abilities

A next step in designing a groupworthy task is to identify multiple abilities inherent in the task. In week 4, you will create a list of multiple abilities that you’ll share with students. You can continue to refine this list as you work on the task.

Stage 3 – Modifying the task, assigning roles, creating the task card

Now you’re ready to begin adapting your task so that it has the features of groupworthy tasks described by Horn (2012). Your readings for Week 5 should help you think about the process. Your end product will be a groupworthy task card that students will use to complete the task. The task card should include a brief description of the roles students will have in their groups (with any specific details for this task.) You can assume students are already familiar with the general description of the roles. You do not need to include evaluation criteria. We’ll do that later in the semester.

Stage 4 – Refining the multiple abilities treatment; presenting the task to students

Now that you have your task, revisit the list of multiple abilities from Stage 2. Revise it to fit the final version of your task, if necessary. Submit the final version of the multiple abilities that you would share with students as a document or a presentation slide(s).

Then, choose one person to explain the multiple abilities to students (pretend like you’re doing this for real, in front of a class). Another person will explain the roles to students (again, pretend like you’re doing this for real, in front of a class). Make an audio or video recording of your presentation of the task and upload it here. Keep in mind that you’re explaining to students…so keep it brief!

Evaluation Criteria

Exceeds Expectations

  • Task focuses on central mathematical concepts or ideas and requires some interpretation.
  • Task provides multiple ways of being competent in problem solving, and the multiple abilities identified are clearly evident in the task (i.e. clearly linked to the specific mathematics content and activity structure; not general).
  • A group is necessary to complete the task (i.e. the task cannot be completed alone or in pairs.)
  • The task is designed in a way that provides group & individual accountability. Group roles are clearly explained and described in ways that are specific to the task.

Meets Expectations

  • Task focuses on central mathematical concepts or ideas and requires some interpretation.
  • Task provides multiple ways of being competent in problem solving, and the multiple abilities identified are clearly identified. But they may not be clearly linked to the specific mathematics content and activity structure (i.e. they are too general – could apply to almost any task.)
  • One student could not complete the task easily, but the work could possibly be done in pairs.
  • The task is designed in a way that provides some group & individual accountability. Group roles are clearly explained, but they are general (i.e. could be used for any task.)

Does Not Meet Expectations (Revision Required)

  • The task is low cognitive demand.